Advertisements

Geek Proud, GeekOut.

Posts tagged “Traditional Games

Amecon 2018 – Joel’s Summary & Gallery

Oh man am I tired. Well done Amecon, I am mentally and bodily drained. What a wonderful and weird weekend, and surprisingly well managed in the face of the adverse conditions.

I am not a hot-weather person, so the forecast of overwhelming heat was daunting in its own right, especially as I’d already resolved to cosplay (more on that later in the week) the concept of layering up beyond the basics of shorts and t-shirt was nightmarish, but I’d already made my decision. A lot of construction being done at Warwick meant some chronic reshuffling of the venue to allow space for all of the events taking place throughout the con, which meant a few insufficiently air-conditioned rooms. In many ways the weather turning on Sunday was a blessing, but I’m already getting ahead of myself.

I’m getting used to arriving on a Thursday to a convention. It usually offers an opportunity to socialise but this year, perhaps because we were not staying on-site (due in no small part to this year’s accommodation issues) we encountered very few people. We instead resolved to return to the hotel early, get a nice meal at the hotel, and kill the evening with some Magic.

Friday! The queue for registration was long and warm, we got a head start on making new friends (hello queue-friend, see you some other time) while the big monitor over the circle gave us an exciting countdown to an animated dance routine by AmeChan that made several reappearances during the weekend – why not, if you’ve put the effort into something like that then get your worth out of it. There were some organisational issues, not so much with managing reg itself, but managing the queue itself, but everyone managed to get through with little enough fuss before opening ceremonies.

Two complaints of my own for the day, apparently as a VIP (or premiere member, whichever) I did not get the traditional box of Pocky in my con-bag, does put a crimp in the start of ones convention, but I was more upset that I was barely boo’d at as I walked past the rest of the queue! Last year was such a delight, I was vilified, hated! None of that this year, shame on all of you.

I attended a handful of panels during the day, starting with an intro to Bunkazilla: a geek culture radio channel hosted online and created by Iain Boulton, his post-convention retirement project. A mech panel with a particularly dirty minded slant that proved as enlightening as it was entertaining, I suddenly understand far more of the jokes in Gurren Lagann. Then onwards to take, what would be a regular post in the traditional games room to prepare for the evening.

Now, Tim may have more pictures than I, but the end of my Friday was the GM’s Round Table panel, and I know I’ve said this to you both already but Chris and Lynsey, thank you both so much for making that panel what it was. While I enjoy hosting panels on my own, it was a much warmer affair to have you both on hand to answer those questions I could not, to really keep the conversation flowing, and turn the hour into an hour and a half.

In the panel we swapped stories, many of which not safe for this website, but tales of character ingenuity turned games master’s despair, conversations on the matters of player management, inter-personal disputes at the table, and some of our proudest and most embarrassing role-play moments. You – the audience – were fantastic, thank you all for the feedback, both positive and negative, it all helps make us better. See you in the future with something bigger and better than before.

There’s a lot of my Saturday I’ll need to circle around to in a day or two, suffice to say that I got an early peek into the dealers room and landed a harvest of dice and materials for a project that’s been in the works for some time. A panel about coffee in anime and gaming proved interesting, delving into how coffee has taken hold as a culture in Japan, although walking in to the gentle smell of a fresh brew was both tantalising, and a cheap trick to buy my affections, bravo. Thank you to those of you who joined the game of Dungeons & Dragons that evening, I shall say nothing about what took place, but those of you who played or witnessed were fantastic, and to you, my table is always open.

It is currently two in the morning, you’ll pardon me if I do not go overly in-depth on the subject of Sunday. I attended a variety of panels, saw some more friends, attempted to actually spend some time catching up with them, all of which felt inadequate, and so many of you I never even got to talk to beyond a quick “Hi, how was your weekend?” Let’s address some of the serious news of the day…

ChairChan is back.

It’s a convention meme that predates my time being involved with conventions, a chair, a magnificent chair, made wondrous by the adoration of its hoard of adoring fans, and the props that get left on it….

Y’know what, that’s not it.

My first convention was at Ayacon Apocalypse in 2013, and in the five years that followed I have learned and done a great deal, and consider myself to be experienced enough to know that I was spoiled, and that the venue may very well be the single greatest venue for an event of this kind, with rooms for panels and events, an enormous live-stage, party rooms, amenities, and on-site accommodation at reasonable rates, the Warwick Art Centre has it all. So the renovations taking place there now can only improve matters, right?

For now, they are a hindrance, an impediment that has caused something of a pall to be cast over next year’s Kitacon, and its bearers are the titans of the committee vacating their posts, and passing the baton down to a new generation of inveterate con-goers, event managers, and dyed-in-the-wool nerds. Their rest is well earned, but the duty of finding a new venue, even a temporary one for Kita 2019 is an uphill battle for anyone. Just don’t take us back to Nottingham guys.

Ame, we will see you again in 2020.

Advertisements

How To Play Magic: the Gathering Draft

Drafting is a great format for entry level play and veterans alike, it gives all players a functioning deck without the advantages of having spent a fortune on their collection. It’s also a great way to try out a new set, grab some great new cards and get more from your average pack of random boosters.

Furthering our long, drawn out series on how to play, here’s how to play one of the more enjoyable Magic styles of play.

The Format

The “buy-in” for a draft is usually three booster packs of fifteen random cards, average price of about £10. Everyone sits around a table, everyone opens one of the boosters they brought, picks a card from it and passes the rest to the left. This continues until the pack is depleted, then everyone moves onto their second pack, passing in the opposite direction, and again with the third, at which point everyone should have a collection of forty-five cards, from which you build a deck of forty or more cards which includes the basic land cards you’ll need to add. (more…)


Magic: the Gathering Deck Building Basics

So, you’ve decided to finally take the financial plunge that is Magic: the Gathering and you want to know what to look out for when making your first deck. Recently, I invested in my third ever booster box which doesn’t come cheap – So join me as I look at building decks in Magic: the Gathering and some hints and tips I like to share with people.

(more…)


GeekOut South-West Meetup This Friday, 11/09

Hello internet, we’re back once again. It’s been nearly a month since we last spoke about our GeekOut meetups and as always, the Bristol geeks are going to get together in a pub to shout and scream their fandoms to the world. We’ll be back in the Old Market Tavern from 5pm until closing time. For those who have never seen our GeekOut Meetups, then buckle up as I talk us through the planned activities for this weeks’ Meetup.

(more…)


Roleplay History – Play By Mail

With my nice new stack of thirty year old magazines at my fingertips I have learned so much about the way we played in the late 1980’s, the way things have changed, the different attitudes and the ways in which technology has improved our gaming experience, and at the same time how it has left gaming styles behind.

Play By Mail

Every magazine in the stack had dozens of adverts for Play By Mail roleplay, and strategy games, covering a wide range of genres, fantasy, sci-fi, organized crime, warfare, even sports.

The set up is simple: players send away to the GM for a rulebook, a guide on how to set up their characters and a down-payment on their first few turns (these things are a business after all). With the character made, the player inducted into the setting and their first turn sent back, usually in the form of a Turn-Sheet, a simple form that players fill to simply detail their actions to make it easier for GMs to read, or to make them readable by computer. The GM then collates all of the moves taken, and mails back the results.

crassi1

These games often support hundreds of players, and turnaround of moves is expected to be quite regular and rapid, so GMs are usually teams of people working in an office. PBM format supported many large companies thriving on the mass collective gaming experience that the style offered, and even formed large events and supporting material, including books on how to start your own company.

The British Play By Mail Association held an annual convention for players and companies alike that supported an award ceremony for best games, best companies and even an award for best GM. It’s fourth event was held on the third of June 1989 at the University of London, eight hundred attendees, easily the equal of some of the biggest conventions in Britain today.

How Things Have Changed

With the rise of the internet and the MMO scene, surely playing roleplays by snail-mail is as dead as disco. Well actually, much like disco, PBM has survived, diversified, and lurks in corners of the internet you might not necessarily go looking round.

It’s a Crime was amongst the most popular PBM games at the time, an organized crime strategy managed by KJC Games. Imagine my surprise when I went poking around and discovered that It’s a Crime is still operating, not only as Play By Mail, but now includes an e-mail option. Not only that, but KJC also run many other games in various other genres. Their prices have dropped, but their model has expanded and includes a lot of facilities that make their job that much easier.

And they are not alone. Play by mail, email, or in-page form are still wide ranging around the internet, simply proving that so long as a market exists, the internet can help creators find it. The internet age may have registered Play By Mail technologically defunct, but it could never destroy the fun that players have playing them.

callisto_in_the_desert

Check out other excellent examples here, and here, or get a more extensive list here.

Play by email is a rising trend, but every form of communication supports various types of RP and strategy games. Forums, message boards, and chatrooms all have their RP groups, public and private, some of which even support as many players as the old PBMs. In short, gamers always find a way. The PBM maybe a diminishing scene, but the format remains alive and well.


The Next GeekOut Meetup – 15/08/15

We’re quickly coming around to our next GeekOut meetup which we’re planning on making bigger and better than ever before. There’s a lot of people signed up to this one (30 at time of writing), which means we should see a good number of people at this event. I’ve decided to start upping my game on what we do at these events too. So what do we have planned for this month?

(more…)


Kitacon – What Timlah’s Looking Forward To

Ah yes, it was last year that I was introduced to the hilarious antics of Kitacon. This year however, Joel and I will be attending the convention as members of press. We’ve checked out our hotels, we’ve seen the schedule of activities and we’ve been following the Facebook and Twitter feeds closely. Today, I’m going to look through the events that excite me the most and perhaps you’ll join in with my excitement!

This marks my tenth convention since I started attending conventions in 2013. Those who don’t know the history of this site may be surprised that the very first convention I went to was the motivation for making GeekOut South-West. The community was such a diverse, embracing spirit that I knew I needed future fixes of convention goodness, as well as an escape from the monotony of life when I’m back in Bristol, through the working weeks. Basically, without attending conventions, I’d probably still be working towards a career. Umm…

Kitaconlogo

Friday

Getting there

This’ll seem like a really bizarre thing to actually look forward to, but I’m really excited about travelling to the convention. There’s something so pleasing about leaving your home, with your bags and your costumes in hand, then making that long journey to wherever your convention is. I’m driving to this convention, as I drive to many of them, with my friend and fellow Kitacon goer Dave who has helped us write on our Top 10’s in the past.

I’ll be leaving my house at around 7am so we can get there nice and early. Dave is looking to play a few games of Magic: the Gathering with me whilst we wait, so it’ll be a good way to refine our decks and how we play as we wait for the event to start. This time, we’re not going to be about 2 hours later than expected. We’re going to be at the event way before it starts so we can get our passes and get the event off to a great start (including Joel and I having to sign the waiver to explain we’re acting as press).

Make, Code, Glow: Microcontrollers 101

Something about making things glow is just damn fascinating to me. Whether it’s rather simple programming that does it, such as the little LED USB connected microcontroller we backed on Kickstarter, mBuino, or it’s a full scale Arduino board – Whatever it is, it’s fun and it’s exciting. It’s time to light ’em up!

mBuino

Opening Ceremony

Yes, the opening ceremony of a convention is really a rite of passage. If you don’t sit through one of these, you lose a fair bit of context for what’s going down at the convention. From Charity Auctions, to Cosplay Competitions and even the Video Game Competitions, the opening ceremony covers them all. It also introduces you to the guests for the convention and allows you to just have a bit of a laugh from the very start of the event.

Quantum [BLEEP]

I’m taking part in Quantum [BLEEP] so I’m excited to see what this is all about. It’s going to be an improvised RPG session – But that’s about as much as I know about it. I’m excited to play the game and find out what mysteries are in store! Hosted by the brilliant Mr Purple who attends many of the UK’s conventions, Joel and I are looking forward to this introduction to Kitacon 2015.

Saturday

Prop Making For Beginners

Okay, so I’ve made a scythe. It’s not great, but it’s a scythe. I’ve also made a large mask. It’s not great, but it’s a large mask. I’m hoping that by attending this panel, there’s going to be a few tips and tricks I can pick up to make prop making easier and all around better.

Cosplay Masquerade

11222982_911626572209691_48440857481535107_o

Who doesn’t love to watch all of the wonderful costumes come to the stage and show their stuff? It’s part of what makes these conventions so damn fun to go to. The effort a lot of people put into their costumes is simply staggering. More than I can ever say for my costumes! Still, I’m hoping to check this out!

Dealers Hall

Another great element of conventions are the awesome selection of dealers you get access to. It usually works out cheaper to buy things at conventions than it does in the shops, as it’s a chance for the dealers to showcase themselves. Perhaps one day, we’ll be able to set up in a Dealers Hall for ourselves? Hey, take note Joel!

Sunday

Speed Cosplay

11040511_911628745542807_2797483116404781500_o

Build a cosplay costume in a short amount of time, using limited resources? Sounds like my idea of heaven! I’m all about making cheap and easy costumes and on Sunday, I’ll be running around as Oskar! Muwahaha, let’s see if I can make something great in a short amount of time!

These Boots Were Made For Walking OR Intro To Mold Making

Both of these panels are taking place at the same time, so I’d ideally like to go to one of them… I’m just uncertain as to which one I should attend! Both would be incredibly useful for me, but we’ll see when I get there, I guess..!

Kita’s Got Talent?!/Closing Ceremony

11780007_913353278703687_3161809844897906879_o

Who doesn’t love a good talent competition? These are usually great fun events and I remember some of the skits fondly from last year. I wonder if there’ll be anyone who can truly take everyone’s breaths away like last year?

This then leads into the very sad closing ceremony, when it’s all over and it’s time to wind down the activities. Having seen what goes on behind the scenes after a closing ceremony, I can tell you now that the staff will be working their behinds off during and after this to make sure everything gets packed away properly. Not all events close after this mind, as we’ll then be led into…

Professor Elemental and Mr. B live set

11705823_913351812037167_3962998606136530160_o

I think enough said here, Professor Elemental makes his return and Mr. B makes his debut at Kitacon. I’m hoping for a jolly good rap off between these two gents of ‘chap hop’! Bitter rivals, yet also great friends, these two will put on one hell of a show!

 

And of course the most important things to Kitacon – The parties and the people! Also, this year, Karaoke! Hopefully Joel and I will be hitting up the Karaoke and embarrassing ourselves. If it happens, expect a bonus video to be recorded of my ‘particularly drunk antics‘ here on GeekOut… or Joel’s so say masterful singing. I think I can see the glass shattering now.

That’s it. That’s what I’m looking forward to most at this years’ Kitacon. I’m really looking forward to it and it’s only 3 working days left as of the time of writing this. Hopefully you’ll not mind seeing all of the posts we do during the event, as we’re all eager for it. My body is ready, my wallet is not… and my cosplays… Well, there’s still time! Buckle up everyone, it’s time to go Back to the Kitacon!


Tabletop Games Industry event in Bristol

In Bristol, on Friday July the 24th, if board games are something you find to be highly fun and interesting, then there may be just the event for you. The industry is always in need of bright people to join in from an artistic point of view.

chaos_logo-e1394489767675

Information taken directly from the Eventbright page:

Creating art and graphics for tabletop games requires a very different set of skills and understanding that you may not be used to. Namely, as well as making sure the art looks amazing, the graphics in a game need to be functional and fit for purpose.

Join us on FRIDAY JULY 24TH (2PM-4PM) for a taster session in how to create practical and functional graphic designs for tabletop games, run by Chaos Publishing.

Board games, cards games and tabletop games are having a huge resurgence and we have many people calling it the Golden Age of gaming.

Sales are booming, more gaming shops are opening up all over the world, interest at events is growing exponentially and even more games are being produced each year than ever before!

So what does this mean for you, the humble artist? Well, the session is entirely free, so it’s time to find out!

This taster will cover a good introduction to how you can get involved in this industry and the best routes to take in utilising your skillset.

Afterwards, we plan on running a workshop over a number of weeks to delve into this subject in much greater detail. There’s only so much we can go through in just a couple of hours, so be sure to register your interest.

DAY SCHEDULE:
2pm: An introduction to the tabletop games industry.
2:30pm: How to seek work in the industry. An insider look.
3pm: What you need to consider when creating art and designing for tabletop games.
3:40pm: Q&A

You can find this event taking place in 51 Merchant St, Bristol, City of Bristol, BS1 3EE

See below for a Google Map of where the event is taking place. Oh and guess what the best thing about this event is? It’s entirely free!

If you end up going to this event, let me know how it goes. I’m reaching out to the event organisers in hopes that we can get some pictures of the event so we can keep you all posted. I’m really excited to know that a company such as Chaos Publishing are getting this active in recruiting more people to developing and designing board games. It’s an exciting time, as board games really have hit an exciting resurgence.

If I’m able to get myself to this event (Tricky as my day job sends me around the country), then I’ll gladly make my way over to get some pictures of the event (permission permitting) and report back what happens. Do you have anything like this in your area? Let us know in the comments below, over on Facebook and Twitter. Hey, whilst you head over to Facebook, check out our latest competition for a free copy of Goblins Know Best.


Top 10 Collectable Games

Not all games are made to include everything in the box. Not all video games are made with all of the content ready. But all games have one thing in common: They’re generally pretty damn fun! However, is it really fun to have games that don’t have all of the required components in the box, or is it just a massive waste of money? We’d argue it’s not always that bad spending money on games that you’ve already poured money into for the base game, I mean some of our favourite games are some of the most expensive games in the world.

Today we want to take a look through what we think is the Top 10 Collectable Games! Join us as we throw all of the cash out of the window as we collect more pieces in the already expensive game of collectable gaming!

(more…)


Top 10 Board Games

They’ve been around for thousands of years, entertaining people from all ages and walks of life. Whilst Video Games are still relatively adolescent, board games are like the great, great, great grandfathers of gaming. They have taught us plenty of strategies, help to keep the mind active and are generally brilliant in social environments as well. They are great in parties as well as between a small group of friends, or even games between lovers.

Yet, one question has remained throughout all of this… Just what are the best board games out there today? Joel and Timlah decide to tackle an extremely tough topic as they dig out their board games, look through what they’ve played, take serious notes (by which I mean we just shouted at one another until we’re blue in the face) and judged each game for the merits they bring to the table. This is the GeekOut South-West list of our Top 10 board games!

Top10 Banner


Top 10

10) King of Tokyo

king-of-tokyo

Giant monsters have a real thing for Tokyo. I suppose once you’ve become unnaturally massive your diet will naturally take a shift for the similarly huge, so skyscrapers eventually end up on the menu.

Take up the role of one such giant monster and slug it out in your own B-Movie battle for Tokyo. Gather power to buy cheesy upgrades like laser beams, fire breath or an extra head. Go straight for the kill, or just chase the points while everyone else is preoccupied.

If your more a Michael Bay fan than Harry Hausen, try King of New-York too. More building smashing, more calling in the military and more strategy!

9) Tsuro

Tsuro

The game of the path is an excellent mixture of chance and strategy, and it’s also elegantly simple. Place your marker at a starting point around the edge of the board, use tiles covered in paths to start your journey, last man standing wins. Oh but everyone else is building their own path, and every tile has four paths on it that could take you somewhere you don’t want to be.

Tsuro is brilliantly quick, really easy to play, harder to master, and massively replayable with so many possible variations. The board and all pieces are beautifully made and designed, as is the sequel Tsuro of the Seas, but I’d rate the original game higher.

8) Battleships

battleship-game-0-360x240

Spawning one of the most memorable catchphrases in all of gaming history, this is a game of placement, strategy, logic and luck. I mean the initial shots are basically just luck, but once you land your first hit, you know a ship is vulnerable. These ships are simply sitting ducks that are perfect targets for you to sink. All of these ships are vulnerable, except the most evil ship of them all.

The patrol boat! It’s just 2 pieces long for crying out loud! Where are you, you nasty little patrol boat! Stop looking for me, I’m looking for you now. I’ve sunk all the rest of your fleet, you have no chance… Oh wait, what are you doing? Oh no…

“You sunk my battle ship!!!”

7) Mouse Trap

Credit: Cinemassacre

Credit: Cinemassacre

First made back in the 1970’s, Mouse Trap is a brilliantly unique game. Whilst it certainly has its faults (such as Joels revelation that his trap rarely worked, whereas my traps nearly always worked), the game is something of a childhood classic. Nostalgic is a great way to describe this game now, but it is still available in shops with more modern editions.

You play as mice who are trying to get their cheese but most importantly: Not to be caught by the mouse trap. As you go through the game, you build up one of the wackiest, zaniest traps in gaming history. These traps puts Acme to shame, as it involves cranks, boots, marbles, divers, bath tubs, rolling tracks and a cage. I loved this game as a kid and I think many others did too, although it wasn’t very well received by critics.

Never the less, this game is simply fun. It’s childish, it’s silly – It’s just a fun game to play, with lots of set up and lots of things to see and do. Its USP however… That trap is ridiculously unique and Loony Tunes-esque.

6) Krosmaster

Krosmaster-Arena-Miniature-Board-Game-04

Collectable chibi figures that beat each other to death with wacky powers in an adorable cartoon arena may sound like a child-friendly concept, but here’s a game for people with a flair for strategy and a cruel streak. It’s not all that simple to play, but once you’ve gotten to grips with it, Krosmaster can be a fast-paced bloodbath of slung dice.

If you want to practice there’s a free version online, and investing in the figure boosters allows you to unlock those characters in the online game. But the board game comes with so much! It’s not cheap, but there’s a huge collection of set pieces, tiles, tokens, and a full playset of figures! It’s quite possibly the best investment you can make in a board game.

5) Dixit

Dixit

So the board is little more than a scoreboard in Dixit, but it’s a lovely game nonetheless. We’ve talked about Dixit before, a game of narrative and descriptive power for the creative types. Players take it in turn to take an art card from their hands, offer a clue to what’s on it, and then other players place their own art cards into the pile that they think match the clue. Not too obvious, or you get no points and everyone else does. Not too obscure, or everyone else gets points and you don’t.

You may find this game requires expansions to keep it fresh, but there are plenty of those to be had, and with new players it can offer a wealth of new perspectives on the cards you thought had become familiar. We love Dixit here at GeekOut South-West, and we’ll offer anyone a game at a convention.

4) Ticket to Ride

Have you ever gone to a train station and decided “Boy, I’d sure like to go from station A to B in the most convoluted way possible!” No? Well that’s a shame, because players of Ticket to Ride surely have.

Surprisingly educational and an easy game to pick up and play, Ticket to Ride is a game that balances simple game play with a lot of strategy and a pinch of luck to go with it. Do you want to be risky and take the longer routes with fear that your competitors might try to take it over. This is the ultimate game of balancing greed and being strategic with your monopolisation of the railway. Be warned though, this game takes minutes to learn with its simple rules of: Each turn you either draw a card, claim a route or get more destination tickets. With such an easy rule set, you’ll be pleased to hear that it’ll keep you and your friends or family entertained for hours.

Also for all of you mobile fans out there, you can buy this board game for a hefty discount from the typical asking price of £25 and above. Seriously, it’s well worth playing this game, even though board games can be expensive, man! Controversial

3) The Settlers of Catan

B000W7JWUA-2-lg

The ultimate resource management board game, the Settlers of Catan sees you in charge of a group of settlers as they build settlements, cities and roads that connect them all together. A simple game to pick up and play that has been praised for how well balanced it is. It’s the modern day board game.

German designed, Catan has had many spin-offs and variants, including many expansions. I’d argue that Settlers of Catan is the board game that helped bring board games back to the centre of social gaming. Having sold more than 15 million units world wide, this board game is easy to pick up and play, which can be played in an hour. The question is, which version do you get? I’d recommend still getting the original.

Although I get a feeling they kind of went wrong when they introduced this to the world…

==1) Chess & Hero Quest

Chess – Joel

The king of games. Little needs to be said, it’s the pinnacle of strategy gaming, there are no elements of chaos like dice or decks of cards, only skill.

When we debated chess and Hero Quest to a standstill, I likened chess to sharks. It’s a design that has barely changed since its’ creation many centuries ago, a few tweaks here and there to made as play intensified, visual aesthetics that reflect trends of the time. Chess is history itself, it’s art, and music, and literature, and narrative.

Nothing can be said about the King of Games that has not already been said a thousand times before by a thousand more eloquent people. It’s also one hell of a way to start arguments.

Hero Quest – Timlah

Hero Quest

This was a board game that was basically a game of Dungeons & Dragons. Amongst some of the special points about Hero Quest are that it’s now quite a rare game to get your hands on. It’s so worth having a go if you can manage to get your hands on it, though.

It’s incredibly expansive with people creating resources for the game, almost to the same degree that people make resources for Dungeons & Dragons. This game was so popular, they took to Kickstarter for a 25th anniversary edition which was highly successful, even though they were met with copyright disputes. This shows that the community for this particular game is so strong still – It’s worth a nod at the very least.

Couple this with encouraging children to learn to tell stories and to teach them basic dungeon master skills, this game is the very foundation for children to progress into tabletop RPGs. It was very well balanced, with lots of great pieces which you could put on the board. With character sheets and rulebooks, this was the ultimate in tabletop RPG… And it was a board game, not pen & paper!

Chess vs Hero Quest

You’ve heard mine and Joels arguments for our respective game choices and now we’re handing it over to you. Do we hand the number one slot to Chess, or do we hand the number one slot to Hero Quest? Two entirely different games, both highly educational in their own rights and incredibly strategic. One promotes healthy competition, whereas the other promotes working together as a team. Now their fate for the ultimate battle of the number one slot is in your hands.


Honourable mentions

Don’t you just hate it when you’re sat there with all of these incredible board games and some people decide to mention these damned games instead? We’re not saying they’re bad or anything, but we’re saying god damn it, why do you even bring this up right now? Still, they deserve the love, even if one is the root of all evil and the other lets you find out who is going to play the root of all evil.

Dungeons and Dragons

DD-5th-Releases

Do you have any idea how many times during an explanation of what D&D is, I’ve been asked “So is it a board game?” and my response always starts the same way, “No, well, ehh… kind of.”

And that’s the point, tabletop RPs are board games that don’t need a board necessarily, but there’s no denying that they can be helpful under certain circumstances. Boards are readily available in huge varieties, pre-made, draw your own, build your own, everything from line drawings to sculptures. Tokens, and figures and dice are all available, even box-sets that’ll give you the whole lot in one go.

But they’re not board games! They’re not!

Well…

Monopoly

British_monopoly

I’m not sure if this game is evil at its core by this point, but the game was first made as a way to demonstrate the evils of property trading. No seriously, that is why Monopoly exists… And it’s very good at getting this point across. This is a game where you have to watch your friends and family turn from your loved ones into vicious, penny pinching, money grabbing monsters before your very eyes.

They want your blood, your thimbles, your wheelbarrows, your dogs and evil your top hats. They do this, not out of love… But this is war. This is a property war and this is Monopoly, damn it!

Whew, I may be getting ahead of myself here, but Monopoly is pure evil and it always brings up heated discussion. Whether you love it or hate it… Monopoly is a game that will tug at peoples heart strings, either from pure love of the game to “hnngh, I’m going to have a heart attack as you mentioned that vile abomination of a game.


That was our list of our Top 10 Board Games and our honourable mentions for this week. Yes, we know, we cheesed it with our honourables, but Monopoly is a necessary evil that needed to be exposed for the evil (but fun evil) that it is. We also have a controversial decision in our contentious first place position, between Chess and Hero Quest. What do you think about that? Let us know what our next Top 10 should be!

As always, if you disagree with our list: Why not shout at us and tell us that we’re stupid in the comments below? Or you can be nice and give us your suggestions and let us know if you think we’ve forgotten a really important board game from this list. Perhaps you like our list but don’t agree with the order? What are your thoughts on us doing a joint first place with Chess and Hero Quest? We had a long, tough debate over this but we couldn’t put a point past either of them. As always, comments below, over on Facebook or Twitter and let us know what you think of our Top 10 for this week!