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Posts tagged “5th edition

Dungeons & Dragons Online Support

This is something of a review, because one area I must criticise 4th edition D&D on was the support it received online.

Enjoying 4th edition places you in something of a minority, but it had it’s truly beneficial features. Stripping away to the bare bones of the system and starting again from scratch was a bold step better executed this time around, but in so doing Wizards of the Coast learned a few valuable lessons. However, for players new to the format the at-will/encounter/daily breakdown of powers, spells and abilities made for a readily comprehendible set-up for combat that was easy to grasp, and for DMs it made the process of creating new monsters, traps and various other key elements much easier.

Still I have come to appreciate 4th’s failings, and it’s hideous decline into Essentials – VAMPIRE IS NOT A CLASS YOU ~cough~ – anyway, and I can almost fully understand the outrage many of the die-hards and old school players felt during the releases. I’ve refuted some of it’s so-called weaknesses, espoused it’s strengths, admitted graciously it’s failures, and recognised how the mistakes I made as a 4th edition DM have hardened me into a far stronger practitioner.

D&D 4e all core (Small)

But that’s not what this article is about, no edition wars in the comments please!

Wizards of the Coast offered up four pieces of support to subscribers to their Insider services: The Dungeon and Dragon magazines offered supplementary rules, errata updates and useful lore to DMs and players respectively, the former with regular dungeons and/or mini-campaigns, the other expanding on class, race and character options.

The Character Builder began as an excellent tool for… well building characters, and better yet it was a piece of downloadable software you could continue to use long after your subscription had ended, but could only be updated while you’re subscribed, seems reasonable. But when Essentials came around the software became restricted to in-browser only, and there were no more updates. Alright, not a great loss, right?

Adventure Tools started life with a catalogue of monsters that the DM could filter by level, role, and keywords, as well as searching by name. It allowed for easy encounter building, and also included a fantastic monster-building tool that did all the essential maths on your behalf, as well as offering up necessary guidelines to help prevent over- or under-powering your creations. Like the character builder it was available to download and update to subscribers, but subscribers never got the one thing they wanted most from the adventure tools, any other adventure tools. The software lived and died as the monster compendium.


Mini rant out of the way, now credit where credit is due.

5th edition began life as a series of .pdf files that were freely available to everyone with a request for as much playtest feedback as possible so that they could refine the game into a cleanly finished product that could be enjoyed by all, and it worked beautifully. What’s even better is that they have not finished the process.

wallpaper_Class- Warlock

If you have any kind of internet-capable mobile device that is able, get the Dragon+ app or get it straight to browser, which features a free monthly magazine with news, articles, lore, podcasts, and even better, new character options that are in a constant state of playtest. For example, the Mystic class – a psychic of many talents that falls somewhere between monk and spell-caster – is currently in its second iteration after a few months of being trialled, and is still subject to change as a final version may never reach a published book, and only ever appear in the hands of those who read regularly. The same is true of some Eberron-specific races like Shifters and Warforged, available somewhere in the archives of Dragon+, I forget where.

Free core rules are readily available for anyone to download including basics on character building for players and a limited selection of classes, races and spells to pick and choose from (although 114 pages is most of the Players Handbook, so you’re not losing all that much), and for DMs a collection of monsters, how to build encounters with them, and some magic items to hand out afterwards. Without spending a penny you can have enough to dabble into the full game, but they’ve given just enough to make the books well worth buying. If you own the books already get these downloaded onto your phone or tablet though, it helps when travelling light, or for sudden and unexpected gaming situations.

So that’s it, right? All the core rules and a nice little collection of extra supplementary material for free. They can’t give any more away, surely?

No, hypothetical reader, I am not done! And stop interrupting me!

Monster-by-Type

If you’re a stalwart of the WotC flagship product then there’s a few other online tools you’ll be familiar with that some consider an absolute must for play. The virtual tabletops Fantasy Grounds and Roll20 are both now fully endorsed by Wizards and have official support for new releases, making it easier for people who prefer to play online – or are forced to by time and distance – to join in and get a richer experience. Granted that support isn’t free, but there’s a limit as to how much can just be handed out.

The DMs Guild powered by the DriveThru team who support content creators for RPGs is a dedicated platform for writers wanting to generate content for D&D within the official guidelines laid down by WotC. That may sound limiting, especially when you can just use the normal DriveThru RPG platform and make money the same way, but if you play by their rules Wizards might just pick up your content to go official, and the chance to have your work appear alongside the official staff writers. It’s a great way for Wizards to source the best material straight from the fan community, but it’s also a great way for writers to make money and get publicity at the same time.

There’s more, there is so much more, from the fan site toolkit, the Podcast (which featured the writer of Rat Queens one time and I squealed like a fangirl), the Open Gaming License, to associations and respective nods to other major companies, many of which fan-made that have grown to industry giants, some of which seemingly unrelated… like My Little Pony… just, click that link, you’ll be richer for the experience. Is it all perfect? No, but it is a huge step towards improving company-customer relations, and one that a company like Wizards sorely needs in order to keep revenue flowing. Those books aren’t cheap, but when you feel like your money is put to good use it all suddenly becomes a little more worthwhile.

Dammit Hasbro, you cunning puppet-masters, you made me love you a little bit.


AmeChibi and e-Collectica Games Day

At the start of the month I said that my April will be full of plans and doings. I give you plans! And doings!

AmeChibi

Where to begin…

Well let’s start with a quick reminder of what AmeChibi is. Ame and Kita have joined forces to cycle their conventions, one small (-Chibi) and one large (-Con), and suffice to say that Ame have taken the lead on the smaller conventions. On that score let me say that AmeChibi did very well, there was about as many events, panels, and parties as one could expect of a convention labelled “Chibi”.

I can’t honestly say that I met many new people (one or two for certain will be memorable additions to my Facebook) but a lot of faces that I already recognized from previous Cons now have names attached to them. Now, and only now do I feel that I’ve properly joined the community, and I took the opportunity this weekend to make sure that I shall not want for friendly faces at future conventions.

The panels on offer were limited, that’s true, but there was enough to fill the weekend, leaving enough time to get to know people, maybe squeeze in an anime screening, a game of Magic or a drink. It was an odd balance to strike, but I think a little more could have been done. I never felt rushed as I do at a regular convention, but at the same time there were some long pauses where rooms were left empty.

Now I know a lot of you guys have some ideas for things you’d like to do for panels, and nothing but nothing is lost by asking around for support and even help running a panel! Get involved, look for KitaChibi next year, AmeChibi the year after and again and again. They want your help, and we want to hear you get involved. Just like I did…

Warning – Plenty of Swearing and I made a few rookie mistakes like putting the map on top of my tablet, and putting the Haribo a bit too close. By the way when I say a lot of swearing, I mean a lot of swearing, I am a cruel DM.

My thanks to Dan, Chris, Gemma and John for playing!

Ahh, were it only happy times all round.

The Britannia Hotel in Nottingham. If you spot that name listed as the venue, avoid the convention, at least until you hear that they’ve done some work, and I mean hard work.

I heard about previous cons held there where the staff had been rude, and that has changed, the staff were quite polite to us over the weekend, one or two even joined in with a round of the theme from Duck Tales. But the rooms have no WiFi, and a CRT TVs without a digital tuner. The rooms themselves are reasonable but not particularly comfortable for the price paid. There were other matters concerning the hotel that I shall not go into here, suffice to say that a complaint will be made, and until I hear otherwise there is a black mark in my book against the Britannia of Nottingham.

Also I forgot to take a camera with me. That was stupid, that was very stupid…

e-Collectica Games Day

By being in Nottingham I may have missed out on the best Games-Day yet, alas I can only live it vicariously through photos sent to me via the e-Collectica Facebook page and by my friend Mike, co-owner of Quotes from the Tabletop.


D&D 5th Edition – Dungeon Master’s Guide

It’s finally here….

DD-5th-Releases

First of all:

AAAAARRRGGGHH

Wizard’s original plan was to release the Players Handbook in August, the Monster Manual in September, an adventure module in October, and the Dungeon Master’s Guide in November. They delayed the DMG’s release until December for reasons that were never exactly explained (but I think I can explain later on), but made good use of the delay by using the promise of previews to raise money for charity, with some quite dramatic success. Then when the new release came around, Wizards of the Coast failed to print enough.

Two other core rulebooks saw international release that was perfectly timed, and yet somehow completing the set proved too difficult?

Regulars of Dungeons & Dragons products, you may already have the same mantra as I have, “Love D&D, hate Wizard’s of the Coast.” Perhaps it’d be more accurate to focus that dislike onto Hasbro (the parent company) but either way infuriating decisions seem to be made at every turn when it comes to the worlds greatest RPG.

They may have printed fewer because there is somewhat less demand. After all, does a skilled player or DM need the DMG to run a game if they have the PHB for the general rules and MM for creatures, animals and characters? Simply put, yes! Traps, poisons, diseases, magic items, creature modification and creation, are all number-heavy game elements that require a great deal of balancing. It’s no small thing to try and reverse-engineer the maths behind the monsters just from the entries in the manual, having a guide is essential.

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But here’s the thing: I have never seen a Dungeon Masters guide offer a more complete guide to re-creating the game, practically from the dice up. Advice on building anything and everything is included. Name an element of the game: monsters, magic items, even races, and (to a lesser extent) classes, including new examples of each, taken step-by-step through the design process. The race-creator was released as a preview, and I had a stab at creating the Bogeyman race, it was a throw-together cobbled from sporadic ideas but my group got a lot of enjoyment from that unique twist in spite of how over-powered Bogeymen turned out to be.

Where experienced DMs will require no help whatsoever is in the building of a world, it’s people and places, and stories. That’s our bread and butter, no matter what kind of DM you are, if you’re good, spinning a good tale comes as second nature. Even so, I’d advise veterans of any game system pick up a copy of the book if you have £30 lying around. Tables for everything! If you wanted to then you could procedurally generate an entire storyline. Roll up a city, roll up the buildings in the streets and everyone living there, from the palaces to the slums. There’s a dice table for every environment, the weather of every day, and maybe 30 tables for putting together fully fleshed out dungeons.

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I may never choose to roll on any of those tables but it was a fight not to sit and write a campaign by just flicking through the pages, finally flesh out the setting I’ve been working on of the last month or two. It’s going to be a struggle to focus on the Super-Hero setting I’ve been working on for nearly three years.

Now here is the real kicker. Remember the biggest issue with the Monster Manual? It has finally been resolved, although granted in the wrong book. I got behind the rallying cry of people who wanted a list of creatures by Challenge Rating (a necessity for encounter building) and it looks like WotC listened. I suspect that the book was pushed back to get the list as an appendix, along with a list of creatures by terrain. That’s my theory, and I’m sticking to it because I’d rather not believe it could be any other reason than “They dun goofed.”

So, a final question from me: Was it worth the wait? Well frankly, no. The book is amazing, and maybe a few more months and some time to sit and play around with the content, but no matter how much I’m getting from the book now I’m still too conscious of how long I’ve had to wait and how much essential content I’ve been missing in the mean time. It’s worth the read, for sure, but if you’ve been waiting as long as I have, you have every right to be irritated.


D&D 5th Edition – Monster Manual

This Tuesday I got hold of my copy of the new Monster Manual, quite literally as soon as it was delivered to my local games shop. The Monster Manual (MM) is a catalogue of creatures that can be used in Dungeons and Dragons campaigns and is the second book that comprises the “core set” essential to play, although truth be told an experienced DM could start running a full game right now, especially as your players have now had a month to play around with the Players Handbook that I reviewed shortly after its’ release.

Now let me be absolutely clear here. I’ve made no small issue of how much I love this edition, and I really tried not to gush too much over the PHB, clearly that didn’t work out very well. I also love Monster Manuals. The first ever game of D&D I played I was thrown in at the deep end and asked to be the DM, and after a quick flip through the 3.5 edition PHB and Dungeon Masters Guide I found myself flipping gleefully through the collection of Monster Manuals I’d been presented with. Now my actual role-play chops were pretty weak back then, and combat was one hell of a beast to get to grips with I’ll admit, but as I leafed through the fantastic menagerie a world of possibilities opened up for me.

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